ELIT415 Shakespeare

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Course Code Course Title Weekly Hours* ECTS Weekly Class Schedule
T P
ELIT415 Shakespeare 2 1 6 Tue 9.00 - 10.50; Thur 10.00 - 10.50
Prerequisite It is a prerequisite to
Lecturer Office Hours / Room / Phone

Currently not available

E-mail
Assistant Assistant E-mail vsuljic@ius.edu.ba
Course Objectives This course introduces students to William Shakespeare as a poet and as a playwright. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the historical context and characteristics of the drama in Shakespeare's times and to identify the reasons for Shakespeare's global popularity in the 21st century. This course will narrow its scope on reading selective material from the vast Shakespeare's output and on seeing a performance of a play either recorded, or a live one. The aim of the course is also to identify the ways in which reading and analyzing plays and theatrical performances can contribute to the students’ perception of social, gender, economic or political problems and their understanding how these issues are presented in the text and performed to the audiences.
Textbook - The Course Reader prepared by V. Suljic - An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama and Writing – Tenth Edition – by X. J. Kennedy and Dana Gioa (Part 3 – Drama), Pearson, 2007
Learning Outcomes After successful  completion of the course, the student will be able to:
  1. Define different elements of a play or a poem.
  2. Show understanding of historical context and characteristics of the drama/theatrical production.
  3. Use appropriate terminology and concepts to discuss the plot, characterization, themes and linguistic devices in selected plays as an individual or as part of a team.
  4. Write an essay - analysis and interpretation of a particular dramatic element using appropriate terminology.
  5. Employ acquired knowledge and skills to analyse and interpret the play as both a literary text and theatrical production and communicate what has been learned.
Teaching Methods The course is student-centered and student-production-oriented. The course outline gives space and opportunities to students with different skills and learning styles to study and express their views through writing, speaking, acting or other forms of communication. The professor will be initiating subjects through short lectures, deliver certain topics, guide class activities, monitor continuous progress of the students, determine texts and plays to be studied, and distribute topics for debate/discussion/presentations. Some general introductory information about the development of drama and theatrical production as well as basic information about the conventions of the play is included in the Course Reader; other handouts/articles/video or audio material will be provided when necessary.
WEEK TOPIC REFERENCE
Week 1 Introduction: the Course outline; Shakespeare's biography; Shakespeare the poet Course Reader pp.5-17
Week 2 Reading a poem; practice; Figures of speech; Imagery; Shakespeare and the historical context of his work and plays; Characteristics of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays Course Reader pp 21-35; The sonnet XXIII; RSC video
Week 3 Shakespeare and literary criticism; Shakespeare's language; rhetorical devices; Quiz #1 Course Reader pp. 36-65
Week 4 The Merchant of Venice: watching the play (recorded); characterization Aberystwyth Wales Theatre Production May 2017
Week 5 The Merchant of Venice: the structure (plot/sub-plots); the settings; themes (prejudice and social injustice; gender roles; money and usury; anti-semitism the play; The Course Reader pp. 66-68
Week 6 The Merchant of Venice: style: rhetorical devices; themes (mercy; love) Scene analysis (Shylock's speech; Portia's speech)
Week 7 MID-TERM EXAM
Week 8 Julius Caesar: sources, historical references; Shakespeare and politics; structure of the play; plot summary, settings lecture (video)
Week 9 Julius Caesar: characterization; themes (power; loyalty) Scene analysis (Act I,2; Act II,1; Act II,2; Act III,1)
Week 10 Julius Caesar: the power of rhetoric The Course Reader pp.69-74; Scene analysis (Act III,2 Brutus' speech; Antony's speech)
Week 11 The Tempest: theatrical production; structure, setting, the plot summary; characterization The play; The Course Reader pp. 75-84
Week 12 The Tempest: themes (magic; power and control; trust and betrayal; recenge; savage vs. civilized; pure love; theatre and actors); linguistic devices; imagery The play; The Course Reader pp. 85-88; Scene analysis (Act I,1)
Week 13 The Tempest:comic sub-lots; comic characters; The Course Reader pp 88-91; Scene Analysis (Act II,2)
Week 14 Revision; Acting a scene; watching a play to be decided
Week 15 Revision; Progress review. Preparation for final exams
Assessment Methods and Criteria Evaluation Tool Quantity Weight Alignment with LOs
Final Exam 1 40
Semester Evaluation Compenents
In-class activity / presentation 1 10 1,2,3,5
In-term exam 1 20 3,4
Quiz 2 20 1,2
Assignment 1 10 3,4,5
***     ECTS Credit Calculation     ***
 Activity Hours Weeks Student Workload Hours Activity Hours Weeks Student Workload Hours
Lecture hours 3 15 45 Assignment 4 1 4
Home study 3 15 45 In-term exam study 10 2 20
Quizes 3 2 6 Final Exam Study 10 3 30
        Total Workload Hours = 150
*T= Teaching, P= Practice ECTS Credit = 6
Course Academic Quality Assurance: Semester Student Survey Last Update Date: 04/03/2020
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