ELIT522 Comparative Studies in Drama

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Course Code Course Title Weekly Hours* ECTS Weekly Class Schedule
T P
ELIT522 Comparative Studies in Drama 6 Monday, 17.00 - 20.00
Prerequisite It is a prerequisite to
Lecturer Vesna Suljic Office Hours Schedule Monday 9.00 - 12.00
E-mail vsuljic@ius.edu.ba
Phone Office / Room No B F1.4
Assistant
E-mail vsuljic@ius.edu.ba
Course Objectives As a collaborative mode of communication, theatre can take many forms. It can interrogate socio-political issues, question modes of cultural preservation or exclusion, present idealized worlds for escapism, offer a highly stimulating sensory experience, or portray familiar stories, characters, and traditions. Through collaboration, playwrights and theatre personnel develop and stage works for diverse audiences. This course aims at graduate students. Instead of presenting a detailed and chronological survey of the theatre, the scope will be narrowed to reading selective material spanning 2,500 years and (possibly) seeing a live performance of a play in the repertoire of one of Sarajevo theatres. By comparing works of different playwrights in different eras, the aim of the course is to identify the ways in which reading and analyzing plays and theatrical performances can contribute to the students’ perception of social, economic or political problems and their understanding how these issues become imagined, contested and rehearsed in plays and productions in different time periods.
Textbook Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama and Writing. Tenth Edition. Kennedy, X. J. & Dana Gioa. London: Pearson. 2007; The Course Reader prepared by V. Suljic; plays: Antigona by Sophocle (441 BCE); Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare (1599); The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Betrold Brecht (1944); Blasted by Sarah Kane (1995); Lysistrata by Aristophanes (411 BCE); The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895); Pygmalion by G.B.Shaw (1913); Endgame by Samuel Beckett (1963); Film: Safety Last by Harold Lloyd (1926 – silent movie); Attention to passengers by Trevor Noagh (2015 – stand-up comedy)
Learning Outcomes After successful  completion of the course, the student will be able to:
  1. State different characteristics of dramatic modes throughout history.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of historical context and characteristics of the drama/theatrical production.
  3. Use appropriate terminology and concepts to discuss the plot, characterization, themes and linguistic devices in selected plays as an individual or as part of a team.
  4. Write an essay - analysis and interpretation of a particular dramatic element using appropriate terminology.
  5. Employ acquired knowledge and skills to analyse and interpret the play as both a literary text and theatrical production and communicate what has been learned.
Teaching Methods Graduate courses are student-centered and student-production-oriented. The course outline gives space and opportunities to students with different skills and learning styles to study and express their views through writing, speaking, acting or other forms of communication. The professor will be initiating subjects through short lectures, deliver certain topics, guide class activities, monitor continuous progress of the students, determine texts and plays to be studied, and distribute topics for presentations. Some general introductory information about the development of drama and theatrical production as well as basic information about the conventions of the play is included in the Course Reader; other handouts/articles/books will be provided when necessary.
WEEK TOPIC REFERENCE
Week 1 Introduction: the Course outline; Drama - play - theatre; Ancient Greek and Roman theatre; tragedy Course Reader pp.5-16; 67-70; 75-76
Week 2 Ancient tragedy: Sophocle's "Antigone"; Themes and motifs; Debate: E.M.Forster's quote Course Reader pp 88-93; the play: Sophocle "Antigone"
Week 3 Development of the drama in the Middle Ages; Elizabethan and Jacobean dramas; Shakespeare's language; Shakespeare: "Julius Caesar": the power of rhetoric the play: Shakespeare "Julius Caesar"; Scene analysis: Act III,2 (Brutus' speech; Antony's speech)
Week 4 "Julius Caesar": sources, historical references; Shakespeare and politics; themes of power and loyalty (Response paper) lecture (video)
Week 5 "Julius Caesar": characterization; Development of drama in 19th century; the modern drama the play:"Julius Caesar" Scene analysis: Act I, 1; Act II,1; Act II,2; Act III,1; The Course Reader pp.40-45
Week 6 Comparison with the ancient Greek theatre / Elizabethan theatre / modern theatre: themes (ownership; motherhood; law and justice); British drama since 1945; Brecht: the epic theatre; In-Yer-Face Theatre the play: "The Caucasian Chalk Circle"; The Course Reader pp.47-66; 113-117
Week 7 MID-TERM EXAM
Week 8 Representation of violence in a play / comparison of the ancient, Renaissance and contemporary drama (Response paper); Comedy in ancient Greece the play: Sarah Kane's "Blasted"; The Course Reader pp. 108-112; 10-12
Week 9 The ancient Greek comedy structure, plot and characterization; language for comic effects the play: Aristophane's "Lysistrata"
Week 10 Comedy of manners / comedy of ideas; linguistic devices/language for comic effects (Response paper) The Course Reader pp.40-41; the play: Oscar Wilde: "The Importance of Being Earnest"
Week 11 Drama in the 20th century The Course Reader pp. 45-47; the play: G.B.Shaw: "Pygmalion";
Week 12 Theatre of absurd the play: Samuel Beckett: "The Endgame"
Week 13 Comedy in cinematography: History of theatrical production; Discussion: effects in the theatre/cinema The Course Reader pp.85-95; silent movie: Harold Lloyd: "Safety Last"
Week 14 stand-up comedy; Revision; Trevor Noah: "Attention to passengers"
Week 15 Revision; Progress review. Preparation for final exams
Assessment Methods and Criteria Evaluation Tool Quantity Weight Alignment with LOs
Final Exam 1 35 3,4
Semester Evaluation Compenents
In-class activity / presentation 1 10 1,2,3,5
In-term exam 1 25 3,4
Assignment / written 3 30 3,4,5
***     ECTS Credit Calculation     ***
 Activity Hours Weeks Student Workload Hours Activity Hours Weeks Student Workload Hours
Lecture hours 3 15 45 Presentation 4 1 4
Home study 3 15 45 In-term exam study 10 2 20
Assignment 3 2 6 Final exam study 10 3 30
        Total Workload Hours = 150
*T= Teaching, P= Practice ECTS Credit = 6
Course Academic Quality Assurance: Semester Student Survey Last Update Date: 29/11/2019
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