Difficulties in differential diagnosis and treatment issues between dissociative disorder and psychotic disorders

TitleDifficulties in differential diagnosis and treatment issues between dissociative disorder and psychotic disorders
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
JournalPsikiyatride Güncel
Volume8
Issue4
Pagination286-292
Publication Languageeng
AuthorsAydın, O
Secondary AuthorsEsen-Danacı, A
Keywordscomorbidity, differential diagnosis, Dissociative disorder, schizophrenia
Abstract

The concept of dissociation was first defined by Pierre Janet. Janet argued that in hysteria, a portion of mental processes disassociates from the
integrity of conscience and gains autonomy, and in a situation where the integrity of conscience is weakened, a number of symptoms such as
somnambulism, hysterical amnesia, fugues and multiple personality emerge under the influence of the autonomous activity of these bits and
pieces of thought. Historically, disassociation has been seen as one of the roots of nosopoetic construct also in schizophrenia and the most
common form of schizophrenic ego fragmentation has been agreed to be disassociation.
Although dissociative disorders have attracted the attention of psychiatry again and found its place in the classification system, it is a group
quite difficult to diagnose. From the conditions it is most commonly confused with, psychotic disorders come in the first place. These two
mental disorders can be confused with each other and also can be seen together, but their treatments differ from one another greatly.
This paper will discuss the similar and different aspects of the common types of dissociative disorder and psychotic symptoms with a
particular focus on how the approach should be in differential diagnosis and treatment.