The relationship between metacognitive beliefs, emotion recognition and internet gaming behavior among adolescents

TitleThe relationship between metacognitive beliefs, emotion recognition and internet gaming behavior among adolescents
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2020
Date PublishedApril
Conference NameSixth Sarajevo Days of Psychology
Publication LanguageEnglish
AuthorsAydın, O, Güçlü, M, Elen, MAkif, Aydın, PÜnal
Place PublishedSarajevo
Keywordsinternet gaming; metacognition; emotion recognition; internet gaming disorder; addiction
Abstract

Although playing internet games can be deemed as a mundane activity that may provide relief to the individual, internet gaming disorder (IGD) is associated with different psychological disturbances among adolescents. On the other hand, the studies which strive to shed light on developmental backgrounds of IGD are still sparse. We aimed to examine the associations between metacognitive beliefs, emotion recognition and internet gaming behavior during the early adolescence period. Four hundred seventy-seven secondary school students were recruited for the study. Internet gaming behaviors were tested via Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT), for assessing the metacognitive beliefs Metacognition Questionnaire for Children (MCQ-C) was utilized, and for emotion recognition Children’s Version of Reading the Mind in the Eye Test (RMET) was applied. This study set out with the aim of assessing the prominence of metacognitive beliefs and emotion recognition in predicting IGD among adolescents. Results revealed that the overall score of MCQ-C was positively associated with IGDT total score. RMET negative subtest was negatively associated with salience, tolerance, conflict, relapse subscales, and total score of IGDT. The total score of IGDT was predicted by positive meta-worry, negative meta-worry subtests of MCQ-C and negative subtest of RMET. Our findings suggested that dysfunctional positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and weaknesses in recognizing negative emotions of others might be associated with pathological internet gaming. This finding may imply that the impact of interventions aimed at IGD can be enhanced by focusing on the maladaptive metacognitive beliefs and emotion recognition.

Refereed DesignationRefereed