ELIT521 Post-Colonial Studies

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Course Code Course Title Weekly Hours* ECTS Weekly Class Schedule
T P
ELIT521 Post-Colonial Studies 6 Tuesday 17.00 - 20.00
Prerequisite It is a prerequisite to
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Course Objectives This course introduces students to key arguments, terms and problems stemming from anti-colonial thought exemplified in the Anglophone literary production in the post-independence era. Drawing on postcolonial theory and through a series of close literary readings of selected works in English language, including those written by the British-colonizer, native and settler writers, students will have the opportunity to reflect on the textual construction of the postcolonial thoughts influenced by historical, social and political processes in which literature has been actively engaged in processes of decolonization and post-independence national identity formation, in particular in relation to forming new ideas about the universal rights of men and women and the individual’s sense of identity. A close analysis of the selected texts in different genres (biography/autobiography/poetry/short story / novel / political writing) may help students to better understand the socio-historical context when the works were written and/or published. The analysis of the selected texts' structure, main themes, style and linguistic devices should enhance the students’ ability to acquire a critical perspective to be utilized during further studies. More specifically, it is hoped that students will improve their overall comprehension and analytical skills to share their views with their peers, prepare presentations and write papers. Therefore, this course aims at fostering the intellectual development of students as they discover the interdisciplinary nature of research in English language and literature, which will prepare them for an academic career after the graduation.
Textbook Elleke Boehmer’s Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors (1995, 2nd edition 2005, Oxford University Press)
Learning Outcomes After successful  completion of the course, the student will be able to:
  1. Identify major issues concerned by postcolonial writers
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of characteristics of postcolonial Anglophone writings, including the historical, cultural, and political influences
  3. Use appropriate terminology and concepts to discuss literary works as an individual or as part of a team
  4. Write an essay - analysis and interpretation of a particular work of literature using appropriate terminology
  5. Employ acquired knowledge and skills to analyse, synthesise and interpret literary works and communicate what has been learned
Teaching Methods Weekly lectures; in-class discussions and group work; close reading, individual work; student self-assessment and peer evaluation; Attendance is compulsory and students are expected to attend at least 70% of the course. Students should come to class having read the assigned material and ready to take part in discussions concerning it. All students are expected to come to class with the texts being studied.
WEEK TOPIC REFERENCE
Week 1 Registration period; introduction to the course and syllabus the syllabus
Week 2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND: Imperialism and Textuality; Colonialist concerns; Rising of national identities; Elleke Boehmer: Colonial and Postcolonial Literature, 2nd Ed. Oxford University Press (2005) Chapters 1, 2 and 3
Week 3 Africa: imperialism / colonialism: a novel THEORETICAL BACKGROUND: Metropolitans and Mimics Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness (1902); Boehmer: Chapter 4
Week 4 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND: Independence; Postcolonialism; Pre-colonial life in Africa / culture / influence of colonialism on identity/religion ); a novel Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart (1958); Boehmer: Chapters 5,6
Week 5 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND: Wole Soyinka by Biodun Jeyifo (Chapter 7 “Things Fall Together: Wole Soyinka in his Own Write): a biography Cambridge Studies in African and Caribbean Literature (2004)
Week 6 Dreams of violence – moving beyond colonialism in Canadian and Caribbean Drama; postcolonial theatre Cambridge Studies in Modern Theatre: Chapter 5:
Week 7 Midterm exam
Week 8 Caribbean: postcolonial perspective on racism / displacement/alienation; Bertha's perspective (in reference to Bronte's Jane Eyre); a novel Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea (1966)
Week 9 Australia: indigenous / assimilation / racism; an autobiography; the settler's perspective: poetry Sally Morgan: My Place (1987); Banjo Paterson: The Man from Snowy River (1917); Henry Lawson: In the Days When the World Was Wide and other verses (1902)
Week 10 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND: Asia: Passive resistance / government/political independence / social and cultural revival (political writing) M.K.Gandhi: Hind Swaraj or Indian Home Rule (1933) Chapters 1 – 8; 18
Week 11 Effects of postcolonial territorial divisions and fragmentation; national identity; migrations; second generation of the colonized/marginalized (a short story) Jhumpa Lahiri: When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine (a short story from “Interpreter of Maladies” short story collection) (1999)
Week 12 Transition to independence / partition of India / fiction - magical realism Salman Rushdie: Midnight’s Children (1981)
Week 13 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND: Postcolonial readings of children’s literature - reconstructing the past, constructing the future Clare Bradford: Unsettling Narratives (2007)
Week 14 Revision; Preparation for final exam; selected works
Week 15 Revision; preparation for final exam
Assessment Methods and Criteria Evaluation Tool Quantity Weight Alignment with LOs
Final Exam 1 40 3,4,5
Semester Evaluation Compenents
In-term exam 1 30 3,4,5
Presentation 2 20 1,2,3,5
Assignment 1 10 1,2,4,5
***     ECTS Credit Calculation     ***
 Activity Hours Weeks Student Workload Hours Activity Hours Weeks Student Workload Hours
Lecture Hours 3 14 42 Presentation 6 2 12
Assignment 4 1 4 In-term exam study 10 2 20
Home study 3 14 42 Final exam study 10 3 30
        Total Workload Hours = 150
*T= Teaching, P= Practice ECTS Credit = 6
Course Academic Quality Assurance: Semester Student Survey Last Update Date: 29/09/2020
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